5 Tips for Developing a Treatment Plan for LEMS

5 Tips for Developing a Treatment Plan for LEMS

Managing a rare disease like Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) can be challenging. One thing that can help patients keep track of everything is a treatment plan developed with the help of their physician.

Here are some tips to get your treatment plan started:

Information about your disease

Include all of the information about LEMS in your treatment plan: what causes it, what the symptoms are, and what things you and your healthcare professionals should be aware of when considering treatments.

What are the options for treatment?

Discuss with your doctor each of the available treatments. Know how they work, how long you would need to take them, and what are the side effects.

What will you try next if the first treatments do not work?

How much will treatments cost? What follow-up appointments or scans will be required as a result of treatment? How often should you meet with your doctor while you are being treated?

Medical history

Keep good records of what treatments have been tried, along with any side effects you observed. Also, keep any scans and the results of any tests within this pack.

Record what vitamins and other medications you take — even if they are not for LEMS — and what times you take each one. Note the dosage for each medication or supplement.

Insurance information

It is a good idea to keep your insurance information together with your treatment plan. That way you have everything you need for medical appointments together in one place.

Review and update your treatment plan regularly

During each appointment, go over your treatment plan with your physician. What has changed? What treatments are working? What new symptoms have you observed?

 

Last updated: August 22, 2019

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Lambert-Eaton News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Emily holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Iowa and is currently a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She graduated with a Masters in Chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology and holds a Bachelors in Biology and Chemistry from the University of Central Arkansas. Emily is passionate about science communication, and, in her free time, writes and illustrates children’s stories.
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Özge has a MSc. in Molecular Genetics from the University of Leicester and a PhD in Developmental Biology from Queen Mary University of London. She worked as a Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Leicester for six years in the field of Behavioural Neurology before moving into science communication. She worked as the Research Communication Officer at a London based charity for almost two years.
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Emily holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Iowa and is currently a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She graduated with a Masters in Chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology and holds a Bachelors in Biology and Chemistry from the University of Central Arkansas. Emily is passionate about science communication, and, in her free time, writes and illustrates children’s stories.
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