Sleep Hygiene for LEMS Patients

Sleep Hygiene for LEMS Patients
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People with Lambert-Eaton syndrome (LEMS) may experience sleep problems. Because a good night’s sleep is essential to your physical and mental health, and to a good quality of life, it may be beneficial for you to practice sleep hygiene.

What is sleep hygiene?

Sleep hygiene is defined as behaviors you choose to do to promote a good night’s sleep, so you will be more alert and active during the day.

Good sleep hygiene includes establishing an evening routine, and going to bed around the same time each night. It also means sleeping for about the same amount of time every night.

Sleep and LEMS

About 60% of LEMS cases are linked to small cell lung cancer. When LEMS is associated with cancer, it is a type of paraneoplastic syndrome of the nervous system, which can cause problems with sleep. Such syndromes develop in some people who have cancer.

For LEMS patients in general, a lack of sleep can worsen symptoms such as fatigue and pain. Sleep disturbances also may contribute to anxiety and depression, which are common in LEMS.

Sleep hygiene tips

Leading up to bedtime, reading or doing something relaxing may help. LEMS symptoms may worsen when you’re warm or have a fever, so consider avoiding hot showers or baths before bed if you are having issues.

Set your bedroom thermostat at a comfortable temperature. Usually, a little cooler is better than warmer, even when you’re experiencing minimal symptoms.

Avoid heavy or spicy foods, and alcohol or stimulants shortly before bedtime.

Resist reading from a phone or computer, or watching TV, for several hours before bedtime. So-called “blue light” from those devices inhibits the release of the hormone melatonin, which helps you sleep.

Other suggestions include limiting daytime naps to 30 minutes, getting adequate exposure to natural light during the day, balancing fluid intake, and having a comfortable mattress and pillows. Perhaps ocean sounds or soothing music can help.

Keeping pain under control also is important to ensuring you get a good night’s sleep. Using heat pads on sore joints can help. You may want to speak with your physician about pain management. They may prescribe a prolonged-release medication that works throughout the night, as well as sleep aids. However, these often are not a viable long-term solutions, because your body can become resistant to their effects.

If your sleep still is not improving, you may want to get a referral to a sleep clinic, where specialists will assess you and attempt to find help for your specific sleep problems.

 

Last updated: Nov. 2, 2020

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Lambert-Eaton News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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Özge has a MSc. in Molecular Genetics from the University of Leicester and a PhD in Developmental Biology from Queen Mary University of London. She worked as a Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Leicester for six years in the field of Behavioural Neurology before moving into science communication. She worked as the Research Communication Officer at a London based charity for almost two years.
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Mary M. Chapman began her professional career at United Press International, running both print and broadcast desks. She then became a Michigan correspondent for what is now Bloomberg BNA, where she mainly covered the automotive industry plus legal, tax and regulatory issues. A member of the Automotive Press Association and one of a relatively small number of women on the car beat, Chapman has discussed the automotive industry multiple times of National Public Radio, and in 2014 was selected as an honorary judge at the prestigious Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She has written for numerous national outlets including Time, People, Al-Jazeera America, Fortune, Daily Beast, MSN.com, Newsweek, The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press. The winner of the Society of Professional Journalists award for outstanding reporting, Chapman has had dozens of articles in The New York Times, including two on the coveted front page. She has completed a manuscript about centenarian car enthusiast Margaret Dunning, titled “Belle of the Concours.”
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