Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

Immune-Related Cancer Therapy Triggers LEMS in Elderly Patient

A rare case of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) triggered by an immune-related cancer therapy was recently described in a case study. Because immunotherapy is relatively new, patients receiving these treatments should be monitored for “unexpected and unknown side effects,” the researchers noted. The case study, “Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome…

Pooled Trial Analysis Confirms Efficacy, Safety of Firdapse in Adults

Firdapse (amifampridine) improved muscle strength and response to nerve cell stimulation in adults with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), a pooled analysis of six clinical trials demonstrated. The findings showed that all six previous trials together “showed significant efficacy, consistent with earlier reports of beneficial efficacy” of Firdapse —…

Patient-reported Data Reliable, Dutch Analysis Finds

Almost all people with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) have generalized symptoms at disease onset, according to an analysis of data from a Dutch patient registry. That finding, and others, were similar between patient-completed questionnaires and medical records, which supported…

LEMS Treatments Don’t Affect Calcium Channels, Study Finds

The molecule 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP) — approved as Firdapse and Ruzurgi to treat people with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) — works to directly induce the release of chemical messengers by binding to potassium channels, without affecting calcium channels as previously thought, a study reported. …